How to Get Rid of Dog Hair and Stop Shedding

If you have ever lived with a dog, you will be aware of the amount of hair they drop each day – even small dogs can drop a bafflingly large amount! Dog fur gets everywhere, so keeping it under control can be a constant challenge. Here are a few things you can try to keep the little hairy tufts at bay.

How to get rid of dog hair on clothes

If your clothes are coming out of the washing machine looking just as hairy as when they went in, then try putting them through the tumble drier for 5-10mins on a low heat before you put them in for a wash. The heat and static will pull fur off the clothes, meaning there is less for your washing machine to deal with. Be sure to clean out the lint trap out thoroughly after doing this – dog hair builds up quickly and can be dangerous if it clogs up.

For a quick freshen-up before leaving the house, consider investing in a sticky lint roller or reusable tool to quickly remove the fur from your top or pants. This also works well to get rid of dog hair on car seats!

How to get rid of dog hair on blankets


Before you wash your dog’s blankets, take them outside and give them a really good shake out. Hold your breath when you do, though – the cloud of dirt and fluff that comes off can be quite impressive!

Tumble drying blankets after a wash will help to loosen up any hairs left on the blanket, but be sure to clean the lint trap out before you put them in. If a blanket is looking particularly hairy when it comes out of the wash, try cleaning the lint trap halfway through drying to make sure that it catches as much fur as possible.

How to get rid of dog hair in washing machine

A build-up of dog hair in your washing machine means your clothes will not come out clean and may also damage your machine over time.

To clean the inside of your washing machine, wipe out the drum with a cloth to loosen any fur that’s caught there. Be sure to check the rubber seal around the door too, as fur often becomes trapped in here during washes.

If you are washing a really hairy load like dog beds or towels, you can get bags to place them in whilst they are being washed, which will trap much of the fur and prevent it getting into your machine. Afterwards, running a short rinse cycle while the machine is empty can also help to clear out any lodged pieces of fur. Be sure to clean out your machine’s filter between each load, too.

Why does my dog shed and molt?


Shedding is natural for wild dogs, and most modern dog breeds will shed too, though some (such as Poodles) have been bred to reduce this. Your dog is continuously growing new fur, and shedding is the way that your dog gets rid of old, broken pieces of fur.

Some dogs shed a lot more at certain times of year, usually spring and autumn. This is called molting, and again is perfectly natural. In the spring, they shed their heavier winter coat to allow them to grow the lighter summer one, and the reverse happens in the autumn.

Tips to reduce shedding

  • Brush or comb your dog regularly. This will remove any loose fur and prevent it from being shed in the house. Some brushes are designed to pull at the hairs to reduce shedding.
  • Bathe your dog to help loosen up the old fur. This should not be done too often, or you risk drying your dog’s skin. Most dogs will only need bathing every 1-3 months, unless they get themselves muddy!
  • Feed a healthy, balanced diet to encourage strong fur growth. The best way to do this is to choose a diet that has been tested through an AAFCO feeding trial to prove that it is nutritionally complete. It is extremely difficult to prepare a nutritionally balanced diet from scratch at home, so this is not recommended.

Conclusion


Living with a dog who sheds means accepting that you will never have a completely fur-free house. However, hopefully these tips will at least help to keep the worst of the fluff at bay!

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